Fretwork but Fret Not (1 of 2)

If you were to read the notes of knitters who have tackled this project, Fretwork designed by Shiri Mor, you would be struck by a few common strands of thinking.  The first common thread is one of curiosity over the sweater’s construction.  I was no different.  In viewing the pattern, you can see how initially it looks like a cabled sweater but then looking more closely you see detached cords that are woven so of course, curiosity sets in as you wonder how in the world does one knit that? Fretwork but Fret Not (1 of 2)

Checkered Cowl

What’s more difficult . . . finding a ready made present or finding a pattern to make your loved one something special?

Recently, I met up with a dear friend, a Mom who was determined to find the just-right item to knit for her daughter.  Where do you begin?  Well, we chose to meet in a local yarn shop and chose to keep the project small.  Keeping in mind the recipient’s tendencies towards tailored suits, the needed attire for her work, we looked for a cowl or scarf pattern that would compliment such an outfit.  We perused a variety of pattern books as well as found samples of knitted garments, similar to what we had in mind.  The samples were not necessarily of the patterns we were looking at but served well as inspiration and gave us a sense of weight and texture of the yarn used.  When we came across this pattern, Checkered Cowl designed by Olga Buraya-Kefelian in the book Scarf Style 2, we stopped and thought how much we liked its features:  the striping, the lacy effect, and the use of fingering weight.  We thought this item would make a lovely gift. Checkered Cowl

Blossom Keepsake

Well, I feel a bit like I have been cheating on my blog as I have been busily writing reviews of recent events that have been happening at the Knitting Guild of Greater Buffalo rather than writing posts, here.  And, the deadline for entries for this monthly newsletter was moved up a week which put a cramp on my style as I wanted to finish a project I was working on, have it photographed, and have it included in the review I wrote about Nicky Epstein’s visit.  Well, I did finish, I did have the photo shoot and I did enter one photograph as per wish.  Remember when I wrote here about Nicky’s  visit to Buffalo, the class I took, the flowers we made, and how I wanted to knit a keepsake of her visit?  Here is my finished effort and let me tell you, so easy to create.  I say create because once you’ve knitted all the flowers, there are a zillion ways you could configure to put this together.

Blossom Keepsake

Sporty Car Coat

When you hear an announcement of a baby who is going to be born, it is always exciting.  When you hear an announcement of a baby who is going to be born and you are a knitter and have time to work up a little something, it is even MORE exciting.  Especially when the newborn is going to be a member of the family! Sporty Car Coat

R.E.D.

Do not mistake my angst as described below with my love of this project.  I love the rich color of the French Red Egyptian cotton and the quality of the fabric that was created with this unique diagonal cable stitch.  It was indeed this wonderful feel, drape, and body of the fabric that singlehandedly motivated me to continue on when I began stumbling with the directions. R.E.D.

Cardipull

4 + 2 + 1 + 1 + 1 = final satisfaction.  This project came to me as I was needing to embark on an easy and lightweight (as in heft) project after the challenging elephant cardigan and the gorgeous, but bulky-to-knit designer tapestry dress.  The 4 in my equation stands for this yarn Manos del Uruguay, Rittenhouse Merino 5-ply, that is the number of times I changed how I was going to use this gorgeous yarn.  It was originally purchased for another project but a change of mind and insistence that I use it headed me into a cabled project but I fell short on yardage.  Then, there was a third attempt but I wasn’t confident that this particular yarn was right so I then settled on this Spring cardigan.  The beautiful part about choosing this pattern is that if I were diligent, it could be finished and worn THIS season!   As I’ve suggested, or at least for my knitting sanity, I find it emotionally comforting that after a challenging project to follow it up by one that just sings.  Easy, no seams, knitted mostly in the round, mostly straight stitch, worsted weight yarn, and minimal fabric.  Perfect.  Not like those Vogue patterns whereby you have to knit double your body width or double your body length of fabric for that fashion impact.

Cardipull

Tapestry Dress

Sometimes you see a project that you have to have against all reasoning.  I asked myself all kinds of questions to try to talk myself out of making this.  What?  I cannot purchase all the yarn needed for this in the same dye lot?  When?  Combination short sleeves with a high neck collar, what season will I wear this?  How?  Pleats with bulky tapestry-like fabric will work?  The more I asked myself these questions, the more I leaned towards believing in Vladimir Teriokhin’s design as seen in Vogue Knitting Holiday issue 2012 and couldn’t wait to make it for the holidays.

Tapestry Dress

Is this a Martin Storey or a Math Story?

Back in August I laid eyes on this beauty, Tembe designed by Martin Storey.  (ok, the model ain’t bad, either.)  The colors, style of the cardigan, the way it was fashioned, and the magnificent elephants all reminded me of my hubby.  He had been asking for a hand knit and had been reminding me of how long it had been since I had knitted anything for him.  Immediately, when I saw this sweater I knew it would be the answer and would perfectly fill the apparent void that was in his wardrobe (and take care of the nagging), not to mention would keep my interest through the process.  I didn’t realize what a mathematical equation it would turn into, however. Is this a Martin Storey or a Math Story?

Long awaited ‘Drapey’ (Part 1 of 2)

Finally and finished!  This has been on my mind since turning the page of that exquisite Vogue Knitting Magazine Issue, way back in the Spring of 2013.  Smitten with this Tom Scott beauty and Tom Scott’s designs, in general, I ordered the yarn immediately thinking that the yarn and my working it up was just around the corner.  Well, you’ve already heard the saga of the yarn purchase and it is now a year and a half later and I’m just now posting the finished garment.  As they say, better late than never. Long awaited ‘Drapey’ (Part 1 of 2)